Business // July 15, 2013 

Can you define your personal brand?

If you had to think about it, you can’t.

Why does it matter?

In the words of business icon Warren Buffet: “Your premium brand had better [be] delivering something special or it’s not going to get the business.”

In the last five years the idea of a “personal brand” has become more important, even if you’re a corporate employee.  Perhaps especially if you’re a corporate employee! With the uncertainty in the economy, people realized that they couldn’t afford to skate through their workdays unnoticed if they wanted to keep their jobs, much less earn a promotion.

If you want to build your career and success, as any MADE woman does, you need to take the initiative, show up every day and look for ways to innovate and stand out.

You need to define your Personal Brand. The POWER of a brand lies in its ability to speak for you and before you.

As any marketing executive can tell you it takes a lot of work to create a brand. So sit down and take some time out to create your own, strong personal brand:

Personal Brand Element #1 – VALUE

Creating your personal brand starts with understanding the value you offer. What differentiates you? What makes you stand out from the competition or your co-workers? Brainstorm your unique skill sets as well as your unique attributes. Are you a good communicator? Do you stay cool under pressure (Emotional Intelligence is just as important as IQ)?

Personal Brand Element #2 – VISIBILITY

What kind of an impression do you want to leave with co-workers, colleagues, clients or managers? This means becoming recognized for something so that even others are talking about you. However, it starts with YOU showing up and stepping out to make yourself visible. Attend networking events, ask for introductions and also offer introductions. All while keeping in mind what it is you want to be known for as the go-to expert.

Personal Brand Element #3 – AUTHENTICITY

It’s personal for a reason. It’s all about YOU. If people sense that you’re being inauthentic, even if it’s with good intentions, they won’t trust you. This means that if you’re trying to be a certain way because that’s how you think you’re supposed to be, you’re inadvertently coming off as untrustworthy. OWN all of YOU.

Personal Brand Element #4 – IMAGE
As the uber-successful Tony Robbins shares, “Initially, style is more important than substance. If you don’t have the right style, you won’t get to share any of your substance.”

Your style and presentation is a visual representation of your brand. Communication is 55% visual. You are communicating who you are before you even get a chance to speak. Your favorite color to wear subconsciously tells people a bit about your values. Your accessories, hair, nails, shoes, etc. is evidence to your attention to detail. Your outfit hints at your personality.  Finally, your image must be appropriate to the audience without completely sacrificing who you are. For example, if it’s a suit culture, add color, accessories and heels to bring in your personality and brand.

Personal Brand Element #5 - CONSISTENCY

Whether you’re going for coffee or leading the meeting, your focus on your visual presentation should be the same. You don’t have to put a lot of effort into your ‘coffee casual’ look to still be polished, professional and confident if you happened to run into a potential client or colleague. The same is true with all written communication – whether on Facebook, in email or on LinkedIN, write with the intention of building your Personal Brand.

What is your Personal Brand? Tell us in the comments below!


Published in Business
Monday, 30 January 2012 08:34

Business | Managing Your Professional Brand

January 30, 2012 

Coca-Cola.  Gap.  Apple.  Christian Louboutin.  As soon as you think about these four brands, it conjures up very specific images and emotions related to them. Love them or hate them, you know what these brands represent. 

Now, insert your name here: ______________. When people see or hear your name they should have strong associations, just like they do to soda companies and fashion lines. There’s no reason why this brand, your brand, should take any more time to distinguish than the four major brands listed above.  After all--back me up on this one--isn’t your own professional brand the most important of all?

From maintaining and advancing your current career to fast-tracking a transition into a new one and everything in between–there’s one, oft-overlooked way to get ahead of the rest:  Build your own brand.  This process will take time, patience, and work outside of your 9-to-5, but if you don’t manage your own brand, better be ready for someone everyone else to do it for you.

Appearance

How you look is not everything, but it’s the first thing.  It seems a little condescending to sit here and remind you that you must “dress for success.”  After all, you’re a reader of ours, which means you likely already know that! Let’s rephrase:  When you walk out of the house each morning, whether you’re headed to the office, coffee with a potential client, or just to run some errands, the way you present yourself equates to the way you feel about yourself, your job, and your future.  Don’t agree?  Then you’re forgetting, this isn’t just about you –this is about how everyone else is going to perceive you –whether you like it or not.  Everyone’s mother loves to remind them: “Honey, you’re never know when you’re going to meet the one!!” She may be talking “husband,” but she has the right idea.  We have many “Ones:” Dream clients, dream careers, and dream projects.  And they all aren’t achieved strictly within the four walls of an office building.  You can land any of them anytime, anywhere.  Yes, even at the grocery store, at a random happy hour, or within a volunteer group you’re involved with.  Building a brand requires consistency.  Consistency in your dress and consistency in your attitude.  So yes, that one time you feel “too tired” too throw on much more than a sweatshirt and holey jeans to grab another cup of coffee with that potential client of yours may be the one time that client quietly questions if that inconsistency of yours will negatively affect the project they were going to put you in charge of.  

Your Digital Footprint

You may not have believed it 5 years ago, but it shouldn’t take much convincing for you to believe it now:  Social Media has the power to single-handedly shape others’ perceptions of you.  Why are so many brands, big and small, jumping on the Facebook/Twitter bandwagon?  Trust us; it’s not just for kicks.  There are whole departments within companies dedicated to ensuring that how you feel about that company is the way they want you to feel about it, and they’re able to do it all via social media.

But if you don’t have an army of people managing your personal SM pages (and you probably don’t, unless you’re Ashton Kutcher post- Penn St. tweet), what’s a girl to do? Well, a few things:

  • Those pesky Facebook security settings may be a pain to keep up with, but that’s not an excuse not to use them.  It doesn’t matter if you go to lunch once a week with those two sweet girls in your office.  If they’re co-workers, they should all be lumped into a special security setting.  Preferably the one that blocks them from seeing pics of your most recent Vegas weekend.  Aiming for a promotion in the near future?  You’ll thank us later.  
  • Nowadays, your LinkedIn profile is taken just as seriously as a resume.  Read that sentence again, think about it, and get to work.  Would you send your resume out minus any job descriptions, a way to get in contact with you, or even without a full list of relevant work experience to hundreds of companies, CEO's, and recruiters every day?  Of course not.  But if you have an incomplete LinkedIn profile, that is essentially what you're doing.  So like we said . . . get to work! 
  • Twitter.  What can 140 characters per tweet possibly do for you?  With the chance to network with the over 18 million users on the site, especially those who are influencers in your profession or the profession you're trying to get your foot in the door with, 140 characters used purposefully can be all you need and more. Remember, being an interactive force on Twitter is the only way more and more people will want to interact with you.  Twitter is not about holding a one-sided conversation.  Search for those in your community or profession who are on Twitter who have resources which could be of value to you, then interact with them.  No one likes a pushy Tweeter or one who is just about promoting oneself, so don't worry if all your conversations with people don't directly relate to your brand, career, and so forth.  But do always remember to be open, friendly, inquisitive, and not only seek out content of value, but give content of value. Whether you are or not, use Twitter to position yourself to be perceived as an expert in your field.

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Once you get your Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter profiles in order, remember to use the same profile pic in all three!  This will ensure you're recognizable across all three platforms, and when you're building your brand online, consistency is key. 

Putting in the Work . . . After Work.

How are you utilizing your time outside of the office?  Going straight home and curling up with a good book and a glass of wine always feels good once in a while, but if that's your routine Mon-Fri, we'll be the first to tell you:  You are missing out on some great career-advancing opportunities.  Many of these opportunities are born out of good ‘ole conversation, and how are you supposed to initiate these conversations if you don't make yourself available to attend networking events, seminars, or to become a member of industry associations?  Most people with powerful brands have powerful friends. Who you know can be integral in reaching your career goals. . .but you must make yourself open to meeting these people first.  While attending these events, have an “elevator speech” pre-prepared. It shouldn't be more than a minute long, because unless something goes horribly wrong, most elevator rides don't take up that much more of your life. This speech should not sound rehearsed, but conversational.  Be able to say what you do, why you're the best at it and what benefit you could provide to others. The point is to first be able to draw your audience in.  And it doesn't matter whether you leave an event with 20 great contacts or just one.  The key is in the personal follow up.  Shoot them an email in the few days following the event, reminding them of a few key points in your conversation and thanking them for their time.  Your time and thoughtfulness will not go unnoticed.  

Once you get into a habit of going to certain industry and community events, people will begin to think of you as an expert in your profession because of the clear, obvious commitment to it they are seeing you demonstrate.  You will also open yourself up to receiving new ideas. Maybe you feel like you've hit a speed-bump on your career path and are not sure what your next move should be. You'd be surprised how one idea coming from someone else can inspire, motivate, and set you back on track. One new idea has the ability to spark a whole chain of unexpected thoughts.  And when you put yourself in a position to be surrounded by like-minded professionals, you are putting yourself in a position to advance yourself further, and faster, than many others.  In the game of creating your personal brand, there are few better positions to be in.  

Building your personal brand does take time, commitment, and continual maintenance, but once you get into the daily habit of ensuring you are putting your best manicured foot forward in all areas of life, it should also be an inspiring, fun, door-opening process as well.  You have everything it takes to become a “Made Woman.”  Why wait to prove it?

Published in Career